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India, China urge rich nations to cut carbon deeper

Developed countries must lead emissions curbs and make good on finance pledge say emerging economies key to climate pact. Rich countries need to take the lead in cutting greenhouse gas emissions, the leaders of India and China have said in an unusual joint statement. Released at the end of two days of talks between Narendra Modi and Xi Jinping, it says developing countries...
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In Kerry’s Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review, Climate and Conflict Are Focus

It’s a bit late, but the second-ever Quadrennial Diplomacy and Development Review (QDDR) is finally here. And it’s a good thing – it’d be a shame if this effort to present a coherent strategic narrative of U.S. diplomacy and development,...
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Quote of the Month

“Beyond borders, climate change can stoke international conflict over the control of vital and increasingly scarce resources — particularly water.” - Laurent Fabius, France Minister of Foreign Affairs and International Development, Op-Ed in the New York Times, 24 April 2015.
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ECC Newsletter Edition 1/2015

We have published the first edition of the Environment, Conflict, and Cooperation Newsletter in 2015. Read how foreign policy makers can use opportunities for green job creation to promote ambitious climate action, about linkages between climate change and fragility in Africa, or how climate change exacerbates conflicts between mining and herding in Mongolia.
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Articles

U.S. passes landmark reforms on resource transparency

Source: Global Witness

15/07/2010 - Global Witness strongly welcomes a ground-breaking new bill, passed by the U.S. Senate today, which will help to lift the curse of corruption and conflict from poor countries that are rich in oil and minerals by promoting greater public oversight and responsible trading practices.

Provisions in the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act (also known as the Financial Reform Act) will require oil, gas and mining companies registered with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) to publicly disclose their tax and revenue payments to governments around the world. This disclosure will deter the corruption which has brought deep poverty and conflict to many resource-rich countries.

The Act will also require companies whose products contain cassiterite(tin ore), coltan, wolframite and gold to disclose to the SEC whether they are sourcing these minerals from the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) or adjoining countries. Companies will have to detail the measures they have taken to avoid sourcing these minerals from DRC armed groups, which are guilty of massacres and other atrocities.  The bill also requires that all information disclosed be independently audited.

"These provisions are a huge victory for corporate accountability in the oil, gas and mining industries, and we commend the leadership of Members of Congress who have steadfastly championed them," said Corinna Gifillan of Global Witness, a non-profit group which has campaigned since the 1990s to break the links between natural resources, corruption and conflict

"As well as helping the people of resource-rich-but-poor countries, these provisions will serve U.S. governmental and commercial interests around the world by promoting stability and responsible corporate investment," said Gilfillan. Global Witness is a co-founder of Publish What You Pay, a global coalition of more than 600 civil society groups that works for transparency in the oil, gas and mining industries.

The House of Representatives approved these reforms on June 30th and the Senate did so today. President Obama is expected to sign the Dodd-Frank legislation into law next week.

"Now is the time for the United Kingdom and other major economies to follow the example of the U.S., so that these crucial reforms can become global standards," said Gilfillan.

For the complete press release, please see Global Witness.